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GUN SAFES: Browning Safes. Built to a higher standard.

Release Date: 1/1/2004

It is an unfortunate fact that too many people put off buying a safe until it is too late, after their prized guns and valuables are lost forever to fire or theft. Even then, people often choose a safe that looks good on the outside, but isn’t up to their security or fire-protection needs. If that is the case, why bother buying a safe? After all, looks add nothing to the protection a safe provides. Only intelligent design and quality construction can prevent fire damage and break-in. A safe is a long-term investment in protection — make sure it’s The Best There Is.®

COMPETITIVE COMPARISON When comparing a Browning/ProSteel safe to the competition, it’s clear to see that there really is no comparison. Here’s why Browning is The Best There Is®
Browning/Pro-Steel Safes Lesser Safes
« CONTINUOUS WELDS »
Browning/ProSteel safes are constructed with continuous welds for optimal strength.
 
Preview Image Preview Image « INTERMITTENT WELDS »
Some lesser safes have intermittent welds, which create weak points in the safe body. Gaps in welds can also create the perfect pry point for a burglar.

« UNI-FORCE™ LOCKING SYSTEM »
Uni-Force™ Locking System –
Browning/ProSteel’s premier locking mechanism (shown) uses robust cam locks and a large, multiple diversion bar system to prevent bolt or handle pressure from reaching the lock. Forces go to the cams and diversion bars, not the lock, creating protection unmatched by any other locking system.

« FORCE DEFLECTOR™ LOCKING SYSTEM »
Browning’s Force Deflector Locking System prevents bolt or handle pressure from reaching the lock using a rotating cam device to deflect force away from the lock. It prevents energy transfer to the lock better than most systems used in the safe industry.

Preview Image Preview Image « DOOR LOCKING MECHANISM »
A lesser locking mechanism allows force from the bolts or handle to reach the critical lock. The only protection for the lock is an after-the-fact relocking device.
« FIRE INSULATION »
Browning/ProSteel safes with longer fire rating times have up to five layers of ½" insulation. See specifications for each safe series for thickness of insulation.
 
Preview Image Preview Image « FIRE INSULATION »
Some safe manufacturers claim a 1550° F rating with as little as 5⁄8" of total insulation thickness. The amount of insulation is the most significant factor in fire resistance. A safe with less insulation will not provide the same fire protection as a safe with
more insulation.
« HINGE »
The massive 1" hinges on Browning/ProSteel’s safes feature a large ½" pin for added strength. The external ball bearing hinges allow
the door to open 180° and ride smoothly. Locking bolts on both sides of the door prevent intruders from breaking into the safe by attacking the hinges.
 
Preview Image Preview Image « HINGE »
Safes with internal hinges may only open
90°, restricting access to the interior of the safe. The hinge pins are often too small and the internal hinge prevents placement of adequate fire insulation.
« PALUSOL™ FIRE SEAL »
The Palusol seal used on Browning fire-resistant safes extends around the door so it is completely sealed in case of a fire. When heated, the Palusol expands to completely seal the door frame. Welds, seams and other areas of the safe are precisely finished.
 
Preview Image Preview Image « FIRE SEAL »
Lesser safes often have gaps in the fire seal and in the main fire insulation. Some lesser safes even use a less-protective seal. Finish quality may be less than precise.
« REINFORCED DOOR FRAME »
Browning/ProSteel safes have a door frame that is reinforced with a sturdy steel U-channel surrounding the entire perimeter. Fire insulation is placed within the reinforcement and completely around the door frame.
Preview Image Preview Image « UN-REINFORCED DOOR FRAME »
Unlike Browning, some safe manufacturers cut costs by not reinforcing the door frame. This fails to protect against prying or pounding, making the door itself a prime target for attack.

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