Chasing mule deer in rough country with Browning SPEED.

Our photographer accompained his friend Blake on a mule deer hunt last week. And what a hunt is was. His friend had a couple of things going for him. Great mule deer hunting location (which shall not be specifically mentioned, on request). New Brownnig SPEED technical hunting clothing with A-Tacs camo. A Hell's Canyon SPEED X-Bolt rilfe. And under nearly perfect conditions.

 

A light snow is always an advantage for spotting game, but does offer a challenge for some camos when moving in and out of the trees. Not a problem for SPEED clothing with A-Tacs camo.

Although this hunt was well scouted in familiar country, the terrain was very extreme, which came into play later in the hunt. 

They had been watching a deer off and on during the day and finally Blake got close enough to consider a shot. At 400 yards he needed to be steady. This crazy little tree was a small help, but really didn't offer the perfect rest . . . 

. . . but it was good enough for the shot -- way up the mountain. About 400 yards.

Usually, you don't like to brace your shot on the barrel. But in hunting, things often just play out the way they play out. The aim is to get the shot.  

At this point our photographer had moved back and out of view of the deer giving Blake some "private time" to work out the shot.

Our photographer also said he wanted to get behind the muzzle brake for obvious reasons. 

If you look closely you can see the buck standing broadside on the mountainside facing to the right near the top of the photo, just right of center.

Can you see him?

Success!. A great hunt. But this was a very long shot on a very steep mountainsite. The deer did them a bit of a favor by sliding and rolling down the hill over a hundred yards. But the cost was high -- a fork on one side and a tip on the other broke on the way down. They searched, but only found the fork.

Yikes!

Nice deer as you can see. That tumble down the hill took a toll, however. The front fork is broken off and also a tip missing from the forward antler on the deer's left side. 

Have you ever ended up with a deer with a broken antler. It happens more often out West where the potential for a long, tumbling fall is higher.

If you have ever had this happen it is not what you hoped for, but getting a nice buck like this is reward enough. And it's nothing a good taxidermist can't fix.

Learn more about Browning SPEED gear used on this hunt.

Photos and story are copyright Browning October 2016. Written permission from Browning is required for any commercial usage.